Rabbit breeding frenzy leaves over 100 up for adoption

More than 100 rabbits submerged a Adelaide RSPCA after a breeding frenzy, leaving the shelter calling on locals to take the animals residence.

The RSPCA was forced to set up makeshift enclosures to house them all.

“It’s more than we’ve ever had before,” RSPCA SA Community Animal Care Manager Sarah Dudley told 9News.

Lonsdale RSPCA has been forced to set up makeshift enclosures to house the new high number of rabbits. (9News)

Two fertile rabbits are partly responsible for Lonsdale’s RSPCA rise.

“We had a case where they had two rabbits that were not desexed and within about four months two became about 120,” Ms Dudley said.

The population explosion is a new record for the RSPCA, with figures up 400% on the same time last year.

The shelter has more than 30 bunnies, including 70 others in temporary foster care, and calls on families to consider adopting their own little Thumper.

Hundreds of rabbits flooded the Lonsdale RSPCA in Adelaide after a breeding frenzy.
Hundreds of rabbits flooded the Lonsdale RSPCA in Adelaide after a breeding frenzy. (9News)

“They are so cute and cuddly and yes why wouldn’t you want one and they are so easy to keep as pets,” said RSPCA Lonsdale volunteer Karla Heuzenroeder.

The RSCPA says it tries to help people see rabbits as normal pets.

“We really try to encourage rabbits to be considered part of the family, just like our dogs and cats,” Ms Dudley said.

Cuddly companions can be clean and can even be kept around the house.

“The days of having them in hutches and people not interacting with them too well are long gone,” Ms Dudley said.

“They make very, very good pets.”

RSPCA workers say the rabbits are cuddly companions who can be toilet trained and can even be kept around the house.
RSPCA workers say the rabbits are cuddly companions who can be toilet trained and can even be kept around the house. (9News)

Some bunnies are happy to be adopted alone, but many, like Angel and Lulu, are bonded in pairs.

The two have been relocated together, so they have a furious friend to socialize with.

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